Available Until 11/15/2022

Infectious Diseases Self-Assessment Program (IDSAP) Book 1: Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities (Cert # L229232)

ACPE Numbers: Various – see listing below
Pre‐Sale Date: 04/20/2022
Content Release Date: 05/16/2022
Expiration Dates: 11/15/2022
Activity Type: Application‐based
CE Credits: 21 contact hours (BPS and ACPE)
Activity Fee: $80 (ASHP member); $120 (non‐member)

This course is intended for board certified pharmacists in need of recertification credit and is designed based on the content outline developed by the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS). The course consists of 4 learning modules (see table below) and provides up to 21 contact hours of continuing pharmacy education and/or recertification credit. 

Learners will be required to review the content and complete the associated online assessments. The learner must be able to correctly answer the questions based upon their interpretation of the content, as well as “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information.” For purposes of this course, “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information” is defined as product labeling and well-established standards of practice in the specialty practice. 

These activities are part of the ACCP and ASHP and professional development program for BCIDP recertification approved by the BPS. 

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and American Society of Health‐System Pharmacists are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as providers of continuing pharmacy education.

The target audience for Infectious Diseases Self-Assessment Program (IDSAP) Book 1: Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities is board certified and advanced-level infectious disease pharmacists involved in evidence-based management strategies for the prevention and management of drug-resistant gram-negative infections.

Board certified pharmacists are eligible to receive up to 21 contact hours of recertification credit for completing this course. To earn recertification credit, learners must review the activity content and successfully complete the online assessments by the deadline. Only completed assessments will be eligible for credit; no partial or incomplete assessments will be processed. You are allowed only one attempt to successfully complete this assessment.

Learning Activity

ACPE Number

Contact Hours (ACPE and BPS)

Assessment Pass Point

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities I

0217-9999-22-044-H01-P

4.0

73%

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities II

0217-9999-22-045-H01-P

6.5

63%

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities III

0217-9999-22-046-H01-P

5.0

60%

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities IV

0217-9999-22-047-H01-P

5.5

63%

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities I
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-22-044-H01-P
Chapter: C. difficile Epidemiology and Treatment

  • Assess the burden of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) on hospitalized and non-hospitalized patients.
  • Analyze the phenotypic and molecular epidemiology of C. difficile to gain insight into the prognosis of CDI and direct antimicrobial stewardship efforts.
  • Distinguish between the drug therapy recommendations in several of the leading CDI guidelines.
  • Evaluate FDA-approved therapies and agents currently used off-label to determine their place in therapy. 

Chapter: C. difficile Infection and the GI Microbiome

  • Assess the role of the GI microbiome in the pathogenesis of primary and recurrent Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI).
  • Distinguish patient-specific microbiome-mediated risk factors for CDI.
  • Evaluate the evidence for microbiome-targeted therapies for CDI primary and secondary prevention. 

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities II
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-22-045-H01-P
Chapter: Low-risk Community-Acquired Intraabdominal Infections

  • Distinguish between the different types of uncomplicated and complicated intra-abdominal infections (IAIs) according to pathophysiology and presumptive microbiology.
  • Evaluate patients with an IAI by risk of treatment failure and death based on patient and infection characteristics.
  • Design an appropriate supportive care plan of the hospitalized patient with an IAI.
  • Develop an appropriate empirical antimicrobial regimen for a patient with an IAI.
  • Develop an appropriate definitive or step-down therapy for a patient with an IAI.

 Chapter: High-risk Community- and Hospital-Acquired Intraabdominal Infections

  • Design an appropriate empiric therapeutic regimen for patients with high-risk CA-cIAI or HA-cIAI.
  • Distinguish appropriate situations when empiric antifungal therapy is warranted.
  • Evaluate microbiology culture results to guide changes in empiric therapy.
  • Develop an appropriate definitive and/or oral stepdown therapy.
  • Justify an appropriate duration of therapy for patients with high-risk CA-cIAI or HA-cIAI. 

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities III
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-22-046-H01-P
Chapter: Kidney Toxicity of Antimicrobials

  • Evaluate the risk of kidney toxicity in patients taking commonly used antibiotic agents.
  • Distinguish the various mechanisms that cause antibiotic-induced kidney toxicity.
  • Classify the severity for acute kidney toxicity and identify traditional and novel urinary biomarkers for antibiotic-induced kidney toxicity.
  • Develop strategies and ways to decrease antibiotic induced kidney toxicity. 

Chapter: Evaluating and Reporting Antimicrobial-Related Harms

  • Apply knowledge of the frequency of antimicrobial-related adverse events.
  • Evaluate patient pharmacotherapy plans for possible antibiotic-related adverse events.
  • Design stewardship strategies to track and prevent antimicrobial harms. 

Abdominopelvic Cavity Infections and Antimicrobial Toxicities IV
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-22-047-H01-P
Interactive Case: Spontaneous Bacterial Peritonitis

  • Distinguish spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) from other types of spontaneous infections, bacteriascites, and secondary peritonitis.
  • Assess the most likely causative pathogen(s) in a patient with SBP according to recent epidemiologic data.
  • Design an optimal anti-infective therapy for a patient with SBP or a common variant of SBP.
  • Evaluate current and alternative/experimental strategies to prevent SBP.
  • Develop antimicrobial stewardship strategies for patients at risk of or diagnosed with SBP. 

Interactive Case: PK/PD Dosing Strategies in UTI

  • Apply basic principles of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics (PK/PD) into patient care.
  • Evaluate patient anatomical structures and the associated anomalies of the genitourinary tract as they relate to drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion processes.
  • Assess unique PK/PD principles as they relate to UTIs that may differ from other sources of infections.
  • Calculate antimicrobial pharmacokinetic parameters specific to UTIs.
  • Evaluate pertinent PK/PD considerations for the treatment of special patient populations. 

Interactive Case: Antimicrobial Prophylaxis for Post-Urologic Surgery UTI

  • Evaluate patients for postoperative UTIs and apply available guideline recommendations for antimicrobial prophylaxis.
  • Evaluate common urologic procedures and patient-specific factors for the risk of postprocedural UTIs.
  • Analyze the supporting evidence for urologic surgery prophylaxis to identify optimal antimicrobial prophylactic regimens.
  • Develop strategies to implement urologic surgery stewardship in practice.

Series Editors

Elizabeth S. Dodds Ashley, Pharm.D., MHS, BCPS
Associate Professor of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Duke University School of Medicine
Director of Operations
Duke Antimicrobial Stewardship Outreach Network (DASON)
Durham, North Carolina

Alan E. Gross, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy
Infectious Diseases Pharmacist
Hospital Pharmacy Services
University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System
Chicago, Illinois

Faculty Panel Chair

Kevin W. Garey, Pharm.D., MS, FASHP, FIDSA, FCCP, BCIDP
Professor and Chair
University of Houston College of Pharmacy
Houston, Texas

Author

Sean N. Avedissian, Pharm.D., MSc
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science
University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Pharmacy
Omaha, Nebraska

Mark Biagi, Pharm.D., AAHIVP
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Illinois at Chicago
Rockford, Illinois

David A. Butler, Pharm.D., BCPS, AAHIVP
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Albany, New York

Travis J. Carlson, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Assistant Professor
Department of Clinical Sciences
High Point University Fred Wilson School of Pharmacy
High Point, North Carolina

Jaclyn Cusumano, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Long Island University
Brooklyn, New York
Infectious Disease Clinical Pharmacist
Mount Sinai Queens Hospital
Astoria, New York

Nicholas Mercuro, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Infectious Diseases Clinical Pharmacist
Department of Pharmacy
Maine Medical Center
Portland, Maine

Marguerite Monogue, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Specialist
Department of Pharmacy
Assistant Professor
Internal Medicine
University of Texas Southwestern
Dallas, Texas

Kelly R. Reveles, Pharm.D., Ph.D., BCPS
Assistant Professor
College of Pharmacy
The University of Texas at Austin
Austin, Texas
Adjoint Assistant Professor
School of Medicine
University of Texas Health San Antonio
San Antonio, Texas

Amelia K. Sofjan, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Translational Research
University of Houston College of Pharmacy
Houston, Texas

Michael P. Veve, Pharm.D., MPH
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Wayne State University
Clinical Pharmacist, Infectious Diseases
Inpatient Pharmacy
Henry Ford Hospital
Detroit, Michigan

Eric H. Young, Pharm.D.
Pharmacotherapy Division
College of Pharmacy
The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy
Austin, Texas
Pharmacotherapy Education & Resource Center
UT Health San Antonio
San Antonio, Texas

Daniel Baker, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCCCP, BCIDP
Advanced Clinical Pharmacist
Department of Pharmacy
Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center
Panama City, Florida

Amanda Barner, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Senior Clinical Pharmacist Specialist – Infectious Diseases
Department of Pharmacy
Cambridge Health Alliance
Cambridge, Massachusetts

Mohamed Hisham Basheer, Pharm.D., BCCCP, BCIDP
Clinical Staff Pharmacist
Department of Pharmacy Services
Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi
Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Clinical Assistant Professor of Medicine
Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine
Case Western Reserve University
Cleveland, Ohio

Dana R. Bowers, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy
Washington State University College of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Yakima, Washington

David Cluck, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Department of Pharmacy Practice
East Tennessee State University Gatton College of Pharmacy
Johnson City, Tennessee

Sara DiTursi, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases
Catholic Health System - Kenmore Mercy Hospital
Buffalo, New York

Anne J. Gonzales-Luna, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Research Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Translational Research
University of Houston College of Pharmacy
Houston, Texas

Alyssa P. Gould, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Infectious Diseases
Department of Pharmacy
Novant Health
Charlotte, North Carolina

Sarah B. Green, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP, AAHIVP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases
Department of Pharmacy
Emory University Hospital
Atlanta, Georgia

Shellee A. Grim, Pharm.D., MS-CTS, FCCP, FIDSA, BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacist
Tumwater, Washington

Yuman Lee, Pharm.D., BCIDP, AAHIVP
Associate Clinical Professor
Clinical Health Professions
St. John’s University College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Queens, New York

Monica V. Mahoney, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Department of Pharmacy
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Boston, Massachusetts

Brittnee N. Miller, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacist
Department of Pharmacy
University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Northwest Campus
Seneca, Pennsylvania

Justin Schmetterer, Pharm.D., Ph.C., BCIDP
Infectious Disease Specialist
Department of Pharmacy
Presbyterian Healthcare Services
Albuquerque, New Mexico

Truc T. Tran, Pharm.D.
Research Scientist
Houston Methodist Research Institute
Houston, Texas

Natalie R. Tucker, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Antimicrobial Stewardship
Department of Pharmacy
HSHS St. John’s Hospital
Springfield, Illinois

Nancy N. Vuong, Pharm.D., MBIOT, BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist - Infectious Diseases
Division of Pharmacy
The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center
Houston, Texas

Jill Waldhoff, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP, CACP
Advisor
College of Applied Health Sciences
University of Illinois
Urbana, Illinois

Eric Wenzler, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP, AAHIVP
Assistant Professor and Infectious Diseases Clinical Pharmacist
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Illinois at Chicago
Chicago, Illinois

Jaye Scott Weston, Pharm.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Irma Lerma Rangel College of Pharmacy
Texas A&M University
College Station, Texas

Linda Yang, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Department of Pharmacy
South Texas Veterans Health Care System
San Antonio, Texas

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) require that all individuals involved in the development of activity content disclose their relevant financial relationships. A person has a relevant financial relationship if the individual of his or her spouse/partner has a financial relationship (e.g. employee, consultant, research grant recipient, speakers bureau, or stockholder) in any amount occurring the in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or series may be discussed in the educational activity content over which the individual has control. The existence of these relationships is provided for the information of participants and should not be assumed to have an adverse impact on the content.

All faculty and planners for ACCP and ASHP education activities are qualified and selected by ACCP and ASHP and required to disclose any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. ACCP and ASHP identifies and resolves conflicts of interest prior to an individual’s participation in development of content for an educational activity. Anyone who refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships must be disqualified from any involvement with a continuing pharmacy education activity.

  • Consultancies: Sam L. Aitken (Merck, Shionogi); Susan L. Davis (Spero, Summit Therapeutics, Entasis Therapeutics); Shaina S. Doyen (Pfizer); Gregory A. Eschenauer (Wolters Kluwer); Alison M. Gulbis (EUSA Pharma); James S. Lewis II (Merck, Cidara); Christopher McCoy (DotHouse Health); Mary L. Staicu (ALK Advisory Board member); Frank P. Tverdek (Shionogi Inc.); Eric Wenzler (Shionogi; Cepheid; GenMark; Merck & Co.)
  • Stock Ownership: Pavithra Srinivas (Walgreens) Royalties:
  • Grants: Sam L. Aitken (Melinta); Christopher M. Bland (ALK Abello, Inc.); Shaina S. Doyen (CDC; The Baptist Foundation); Rachel V. Marini (Merck Research Laboratories); Eric Wenzler (Shionogi, Daiichi-Sankyo, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck & Co. Inc., Paratek Pharmaceuticals, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Astellas Pharma; CDC)
  • Honoraria: Shaina S. Doyen (Kentucky Department for Public Health); Madeline A. King (Tetraphase); Christopher McCoy (Northeastern University; Harvard University); Pavithra Srinivas (ASTCT); Frank P. Tverdek (Terranova/SIDP; Transplantation and Cellular Therapy Meeting); Eric Wenzler (Melinta Therapeutics; Astellas; Allergan Plc)

All other planners, presenters, reviewers, ACCP and ASHP staff and others with an opportunity to control content report no financial relationships relevant to this activity.

Activities consist of educational materials, assessments, and activity evaluations. In order to receive continuing pharmacy education credit, learners must:

  • Complete the attestation statement
  • Review all content
  • Complete and pass the assessments
  • Complete the evaluations

Follow the prompts to claim, view, or print the statement of credit within 60 days after completing the activity.

These activities were developed by ACCP and ASHP.