Ambulatory Care Self-Assessment Program (ACSAP) Book 2: Women's and Men's Care (Cert # L219334)

ACPE Numbers: Various – see listing below
Pre-Sale Date: N/A
Release Date: 07/15/2021
Expiration Dates: 01/18/2022
Activity Type: Application-based
CE Credits: 19 hours (BPS and ACPE)
Activity Fee: $75 (ASHP member); $110 (non-member)

Accreditation for Pharmacists

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as providers of continuing pharmacy education.

Target Audience

The target audience for ACSAP 2021 Book 2 (Women’s and Men’s Care) is board-certified and advanced level ambulatory care clinical pharmacists who provide care for patients with common women’s and men’s health issues.

Activity Overview

This course is intended for board certified pharmacists in need of recertification credit and is designed based on the content outline developed by the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS). The course consists of 4 learning modules (see table below) and provides up to 19 hours of continuing pharmacy education and/or recertification credit. 

Learners will be required to review the content and complete the associated online assessments. The learner must be able to correctly answer the questions based upon their interpretation of the content, as well as “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information.” For purposes of this course, “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information” is defined as product labeling and well-established standards of practice in the specialty practice. 

These activities are part of the ASHP and ACCP professional development program for BCACP recertification approved by the BPS. 

Recertification Credit*

Board certified pharmacists are eligible to receive up to 19hours of recertification credit for completing this course. To earn recertification credit, learners must review the activity content and successfully complete the online assessments by the deadline. Only completed assessments will be eligible for credit; no partial or incomplete assessments will be processed. You are allowed only one attempt to successfully complete this assessment.

Learning Activity

ACPE Number

Credit Hours

*Assessment Pass Point

Women's and Men's Care I

0217-9999-21-026-H01-P

5

70%

Women's and Men's Care II

0217-9999-21-027-H01-P

6

66%

Women's and Men's Care III

0217-9999-21-028-H01-P

4

70%

Women's and Men's Care III

0217-9999-21-029-H01-P

4

66%

 

Please note, the Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Preparatory Review and Recertification Courses, as well as the Fundamentals of Biostatistics and Study Design Workshop, may only be completed for recertification credit up to two times, in nonconsecutive years, during the 7-year recertification cycle.

Learning Objectives

Women’s and Men’s Care I
ACPE Number:  0217-9999-21-026-H01-P 

Contraception Updates

  • Evaluate legislative updates related to contraception access and the pharmacist’s role in contraception prescribing.
  • Assess patients forimpact and scope of unintended pregnancies.
  • Compare and contrast the safety and efficacy of highly effective long-term and emergency contraception products.
  • Evaluate patients for contraception screening and assessment on the basis of CDC medical eligibility criteria and of select practice recommendations.
  • Develop a patient-specific contraception plan for long-term and emergency contraception methods based on advantages, disadvantages, patient preferences, medical eligibility criteria, and screening assessments. 

Menopausal Symptom Management

  • On the basis of patient evaluation, develop optimal treatment for menopausal symptoms.
  • Evaluate risks and benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT) to optimize patient management.
  • Evaluate effectiveness of nonhormonal therapy options for menopausal symptoms.
  • Develop appropriate monitoring and duration of therapy for patients on MHT.
  • Account for clinical controversies related to MHT in designing a patient-centered care plan. 

Women’s and Men’s Care II
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-21-027-H01-P 

Gestational Diabetes

  • Assess patients for potential maternal and fetal complications associated with uncontrolled diabetes mellitus during pregnancy.
  • Evaluate the various screening approaches used to diagnose gestational diabetes.
  • Design a complete treatment plan for a patient with a new diagnosis of gestational diabetes, including monitoring recommendations, nonpharmacologic therapy, and pharmacologic therapy.
  • Evaluate the place in therapy for oral hypoglycemic regimens in the treatment of gestational diabetes.
  • Evaluate the place in therapy for low-dose aspirin for pregnant patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.
  • Develop a plan for intrapartum and postpartum management for a patient with gestational diabetes. 

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

  • Assess patients for pathophysiology and diagnostic criteria of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and its health impacts.
  • Assess the benefit of nonpharmacologic approaches to reduce symptoms of PCOS.
  • Evaluate pharmacologic options for treating PCOS based on patients’ symptoms and characteristics.

Develop a pharmacotherapy care plan for an individual patient with PCOS, including follow-up and monitoring. 

Women’s and Men’s Care III
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-21-028-H01-P 

Female Sexual Dysfunction

  • Evaluate patients for symptoms associated with female sexual interest/arousal disorder (FSIAD), genitor-pelvic pain/penetration disorder (GPPPD), and female orgasmic disorder (FOD).
  • Develop individualized, symptom-based treatment plans for women with FSIAD and GPPPD.
  • Distinguish between pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic treatment options for FSIAD, GPPPD, and FOD.
  • Assess patients for medication-induced sexual dysfunction and recommend alternative treatment plans. 

Male Sexual Dysfunction

  • Evaluate patient risk factors for erectile dysfunction and distinguish between different etiologies of the disorder.
  • Evaluate the role of assessment tools needed to appropriately diagnose patients with male sexual dysfunction.
  • Assess the efficacy and safety of pharmacologic options to treat erectile dysfunction.
  • Develop a plan for treatment options for patients who fail or are not candidates for medical therapy for erectile dysfunction.
  • Justify the pharmacist’s role in managing patients with erectile dysfunction. 

Women’s and Men’s Care IV
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-21-029-H01-P 

Interactive Case: Opioid Use Disorder in Pregnancy

  • Evaluate the impact of opioid use disorder (OUD) on pregnancy- and neonatal-related outcomes.
  • Distinguish benefits and limitations of current OUD therapies in pregnancy.
  • Using pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic alterations expected in pregnancy, design therapies for OUD.
  • Design appropriate therapy for a patient with OUD in pregnancy.
  • Develop a screening plan for common conditions associated with OUD in pregnancy.
  • Design pain management therapy for pregnant women given a diagnosis of OUD during labor, delivery, and postpartum. 

Interactive Case: Infertility, Ovulation Disorders

  • Assess patient risk factors for ovulation disorders.
  • Evaluate treatment options for patients with ovulation disorders.
  • Develop pharmacotherapy for the patient with an ovulation disorder.
  • Apply knowledge of ovulation disorder treatment to pharmacy practice. 

Faculty Panel Chair

Rebecca H. Stone, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCACP
Clinical Associate Professor
Department of Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy
University of Georgia
Athens, Georgia 

Series Editors

Dave L. Dixon, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCPS, CDCES, CLS, FNLA, FCCP, FACC
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Sciences
Virginia Commonwealth University
School of Pharmacy
Richmond, Virginia 

Ila M. Harris, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
University of Minnesota Medical School
Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Reviewers

Laura M. Borgelt, Pharm.D., MBA, FCCP, BCPS
Associate Vice Chancellor of Strategic Initiatives Professor
Departments of Clinical Pharmacy and Family Medicine
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
Aurora, Colorado 

Victoria Cho, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Department of Pharmacy
Southwest General
Middleburg Heights, Ohio 

Nicole E. Cieri-Hutcherson, Pharm.D., BCPS, NCMP
Director of Education and Professional Development
University at Buffalo School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Clinical Pharmacist, Internal Medicine Buffalo General Medical Center
Buffalo, New York 

Lisa Edgerton, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCPS
Clinical Pharmacist
Residency Program Director PGY2
Ambulatory Care Pharmacy
Department of Pharmacy
Novant Health New Hanover Regional Medical Center
Wilmington, North Carolina 

Alicia B. Forinash, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCACP
Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Health Sciences
Pharmacy Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Maternal Fetal Care Center SSM Health St. Mary’s
St. Louis, Missouri 

Stacy C. Gee, Pharm.D., BCACP
Pharmacist
Department of Administration—Tribal and Commercial Health
Chickasaw Nation
Ada, Oklahoma 

Kristen Lamberjack, Pharm.D., BCACP, AAHIVP
Advanced Patient Care Pharmacist
Department of Pharmacy
Nationwide Children’s Hospital
Columbus, Ohio 

Ashley H. Meredith, Pharm.D., MPH, FCCP, BCACP, BCPS,  CDCES
Clinical Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Purdue University
West Lafayette, Indiana

Taryn Mondiello, Pharm.D., BCACP, AE-C
Pharmacotherapy Specialist, Transitions of Care/Adult Medicine
Pharmacotherapy Department
The Brooklyn Hospital Center
Brooklyn, New York         

Melissa Murfin, Pharm.D., MPAS, BCACP, PA-C
Associate Professor
Director of Curriculum and Instruction Research Coordinator
Physician Assistant Studies Elon University
Elon, North Carolina 

Sharmon P. Osae, Pharm.D., BCACP
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy
University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, SWGA Clinical Campus
Albany, Georgia 

Jared L. Ostroff, Pharm.D., MBA, BCACP, BCGP
Clinical Pharmacy Coordinator
Acute Care Pharmacy Services
Baystate Health
Springfield,  Massachusetts 

Louise Parent-Stevens, Pharm.D., BCPS
Pharmacist
Oak Park, Illinois

Kristin A. Tallman, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist–Ambulatory Care
Department of Clinical Pharmacy
Providence Medical Group
Portland, Oregon 

Kathleen M. Vest, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES
Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Midwestern University
College of Pharmacy
Downer’s Grove, Illinois 

Katherine Vogel Anderson, Pharm.D., BCACP
Associate Professor
University of Florida
Colleges of Pharmacy and Medicine
Department of Pharmacotherapy
and Translational Research
Division of General Internal Medicine
Gainesville, Florida 

Takova D. Wallace-Gay, Pharm.D., BCACP
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Clinical Sciences
The University of Texas at Tyler, Ben and Maytee Fisch
College of Pharmacy
Clinical Pharmacist
Department of Family Medicine
The University of Texas Health Science Center at Tyler–North Campus
Tyler, Texas 

Abigail M. Yancey, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
St. Louis College of Pharmacy at University of Health Sciences & Pharmacy in St. Louis
St. Louis, Missouri 

Authors

Regina Arellano, B.S., Pharm.D., BCPS
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Midwestern University College of Pharmacy
Downers Grove Campus
Downers Grove, Illinois
Clinical Pharmacist
Departments of Internal Medicine/Family Practice
Advocate Medical Group—Evergreen Center
Chicago, Illinois 

Kylie N. Barnes, Pharm.D, BCPS
Clinical Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration
University of Missouri—Kansas City School of Pharmacy
Kansas City, Missouri 

Kassandra M. Bartelme, Pharm.D., BCACP
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Concordia University
School of Pharmacy
Mequon, Wisconsin 

Lauren Lakdawala, Pharm.D., BCACP
Clinical Coordinator II
Outpatient Pharmacy, Specialty Services
Johns Hopkins Home Care Group
Baltimore, Maryland 

Lauren D. Leader, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Obstetrics Department of Pharmacy Services
Michigan Medicine
Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Mindi S. Miller, Pharm.D., BCPS
Clinical Associate Professor
Clinical and Administrative Pharmacy; Experience Programs
University of Georgia College of Pharmacy
Athens, Georgia 

Jaini Patel, Pharm.D., BCACP
Associate Professor
Pharmacy Practice
Midwestern University
College of Pharmacy
Downers Grove, Illinois 

Erin C. Raney, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BC-ADM
Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Midwestern University College of Pharmacy, Glendale Campus
Glendale, Arizona 

Sarah M. Westberg, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor
Co-Associate Dean of Clinical Affairs
MTM Practitioner, Women’s Health Specialists
Clinic Pharmaceutical Care and Health Systems
University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy
Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Acknowledgment:

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Women’s and Men’s Care I chapters: 

Ila M. Harris, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Professor
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
University of Minnesota Medical School
Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Toni L. Ripley, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Department of Pharmacy, Clinical Section
Oklahoma City VA Health Care System
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Women’s and Men’s Care II chapters: 

Dave L. Dixon, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCPS, CDE, CLS, FNLA, FCCP, FACC, Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Sciences
Virginia Commonwealth University
School of Pharmacy
Richmond, Virginia 

Anne L. Hume, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor of Pharmacy
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Rhode Island
Kingston, Rhode Island
Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine
Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University
Providence, Rhode Island 

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Women’s and Men’s Care III chapters: 

Lynn Kassel, Pharm.D., BCPS
Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences
Department of Clinical Sciences
Drake University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
Des Moines, Iowa
Acute Care Pharmacist
MercyOne West Des Moines Hospital
West Des Moines, Iowa 

Christine K. O’Neil, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCGP, CTTS
Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Assistant Dean, Curriculum Development & Interprofessional Education
School of Pharmacy
Duquesne University
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Women’s and Men’s Care IV chapters: 

Marisel Segarra-Newnham, Pharm.D., MPH, FCCP, BCPS, BCIDP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Infectious Diseases/HIV Antimicrobial Stewardship Program
Pharmacy Director
Veterans Affairs Medical Center
West Palm Beach, Florida
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
University of Florida
College of Pharmacy
Gainesville, Florida 

Mary Wun-Len Lee, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Vice President and Special Assistant to the President
Midwestern University
Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Chicago College of Pharmacy
Downers Grove, Illinois 

Disclosures

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, ASHP and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy require that all individuals involved in the development of activity content disclose their relevant financial relationships. A person has a relevant financial relationship if the individual of his or her spouse/partner has a financial relationship (e.g. employee, consultant, research grant recipient, speakers bureau, or stockholder) in any amount occurring the in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or series may be discussed in the educational activity content over which the individual has control. The existence of these relationships is provided for the information of participants and should not be assumed to have an adverse impact on the content. 

All faculty and planners for ASHP education activities are qualified and selected by ASHP and required to disclose any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. ASHP identifies and resolves conflicts of interest prior to an individual’s participation in development of content for an educational activity. Anyone who refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships must be disqualified from any involvement with a continuing pharmacy education activity.

  • Consultancies: Kylie N. Barnes (Wolters-Kluwer); Lauren Denise Leader (Lexicomp); Lauren Lakdawala (Maryland Pharmacists Association); Kristen Lamberjack (Oscar P and T Committee); Ashley H. Meredith (Birth Control Pharmacist; ACCP); Sarah M. Westberg (Minnesota Pharmacists  Association)
  • Royalties: Alicia B. Forinash (Wolters-Kluwer); Louise Parent-Stevens (McGraw-Hill); Rebecca Stone (McGraw-Hill); Sara M. Westberg (McGraw-Hill)
  • Grants: Kassandra M. Bartelme (ACCP); Melissa Murfin (Physician Assistant Education Association); Sharmon P. Osae (University of Georgia College of Pharmacy); Sarah M. Westberg (NIH, National Heart, lung and Blood Institute)
  • Honoraria: Laura M. Borgelt (PharmCon, Inc.); Lauren Shirin Lakdawala (Virginia Pharmacists Association; Maryland Pharmacists Association); Rebecca Stone (Surgent/PharmaCon; ACCP) 

All other planners, presenters, reviewers, ACCP and ASHP staff and others with an opportunity to control content report no financial relationships relevant to this activity. 

Methods and CE Requirements

Activities consist of educational materials, assessments, and activity evaluations. In order to receive continuing pharmacy education credit, learners must:

  • Complete the attestation statement
  • Review all content
  • Complete and pass the assessments
  • Complete the evaluations 

Follow the prompts to claim, view, or print the statement of credit within 60 days after completing the activity. 

System Technical Requirements

Courses and learning activities are delivered via your Web browser and Acrobat PDF. For all activities, you should have a basic comfort level using a computer and navigating web sites. 

View the minimum technical and system requirements for learning activities. 

Development

These activities were developed by ACCP and ASHP.