Available Until 8/4/2024

Clinical Skills Certificate for International Pharmacy

ACPE Numbers: Various – see listing below
Release Date: 8/4/2021
Expiration Dates: 8/4/2024
Activity Type: Application-based
CE Credits: 23.5 hours
Activity Fee: $395 (ASHP Member); $495 (Non-member)  

Overview

This self-guided, online program will provide 23.5 hours of ACPE continuing education for pharmacists, incorporating recorded presentations and practice activities.  These modules are designed to teach fundamental concepts of patient-centered clinical skills for pharmacists practicing or trained outside of the United States of America. The curriculum will cover core principles of clinical pharmacy practice and patient care roles of pharmacists. The course will present pharmacist-led activities in key clinical areas. After completing all of the modules, participants will have the foundational knowledge necessary to provide clinical pharmacy services in their practice settings. 

Professional Certificate Requirement 

Once a learner has successfully completed the educational curriculum, he/she will have the opportunity to complete a 73-question comprehensive exam. If the learner successfully completes the exam (minimum 80% passing rate; unlimited attempts permitted), he/she will be eligible to earn the professional certificate. 

The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as a provider of continuing pharmacy education.

This certificate is intended for pharmacists who are interested in gaining the foundational knowledge necessary to provide clinical pharmacy services in their practice settings. Participants will be assumed to have the required pharmacy content knowledge but not necessarily the education-related knowledge and skills included in this certificate. 

Learning Activity

ACPE Number

Contact Hours

Orientation to Clinical Pharmacy Practice, Pharmacists as Caregivers, and Transitions of Care

0204-0000-21-781-H04-P

3.25

Evidence-based Medicine and Drug Information

0204-0000-21-782-H04-P

2.0

Renal Pharmacotherapy and Fluids and Electrolytes

0204-0000-21-783-H01-P

2.50

Pharmacokinetics, Nutrition, and Critical Care

0204-0000-21-784-H01-P

3.0 

Diabetes, Cardiovascular, and Dermatologic Pharmacotherapy

0204-0000-21-785-H01-P 3.0

Special Populations and Infectious Diseases

0204-0000-21-786-H01-P 2.0

Pulmonary Disorders

0204-0000-21-787-H01-P 2.5

Gastrointestinal Disorders and Coping with Chemotherapy

0204-0000-21-788-H01-P 1.75

Neurological Disorders, Pain Management, and Rheumatology

0204-0000-21-789-H01-P 3.5

Orientation to Clinical Pharmacy Practice, Pharmacists as Caregivers, and Transitions of Care
0204-0000-21-781-H04-P

  • Summarize the history, evolution, and advancement of clinical pharmacy practice 
  • Describe the standards of practice for a hospital clinical pharmacist in the United States of America
  • Discuss how ambulatory care pharmacists address the provision of integrated, accessible healthcare services for ambulatory patients in a wide variety of settings, including community pharmacies, clinic, and physician offices
  • Identify the importance of supporting futuristic practice models that support the most effective use of pharmacists as direct patient care providers
  • Describe the role of the clinical pharmacist on the patient care team
  • Discuss information obtained from the patient medical record used to develop drug therapy recommendations
  • Identify drug information resources available to assist clinical pharmacists
  • Describe strategies to monitor and document patient response to pharmacotherapy interventions using a patient medical record
  • Describe the role of the pharmacist in care transitions between multiple settings
  • Explain the steps to complete a medication history and medication reconciliation
  • Describe evidence supporting the role of pharmacists in admission and discharge medication reconciliation

 

Evidence-based Medicine and Drug Information
0204-0000-21-782-H04-P

  • Describe the elements of evidence-based medicine
  • Evaluate study design for appropriateness and limitations
  • Assess clinical practice guidelines for validity and applicability
  • Solve biostatistics calculations
  • Describe the role of the pharmacist in providing drug information
  • Differentiate between primary, secondary, and tertiary sources of information

 

Renal Pharmacotherapy and Fluids and Electrolytes
0204-0000-21-783-H01-P

  • Describe the role of key components of the nephron
  • Explain how glomerular filtration, active secretion, and passive reabsorption contribute to renal clearance
  • Select a medication dose using the Cockcroft-Gault equation
  • Describe the distribution of total body fluid and expected distribution of various intravenous fluids
  • Compare examples of a hypotonic fluid, isotonic fluid, and hypertonic fluid
  • Recommend pharmacotherapy interventions based on patient criteria and electrolyte abnormalities

 

Pharmacokinetics, Nutrition, and Critical Care
0204-0000-21-784-H01-P

  • Describe clinical pharmacodynamics as it relates to medication dosing
  • Describe the role of pharmacokinetics in therapeutic drug monitoring in medications such as vancomycin and aminoglycosides
  • Differentiate between pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics
  • Describe nutritional requirements
  • Compare and contrast enteral and parenteral nutrition in hospitalized patients
  • Identify the signs and symptoms of refeeding syndrome
  • Describe common medication related challenges in critically ill patients
  • Identify drug related problems in the intensive care unit
  • Apply guideline-based interventions in patients with sepsis
  • Contrast treatment approaches for analgesia and sedation in critically ill patients
  • Assess how to treat and prevent delirium in the intensive care unit

 

Diabetes, Cardiovascular, and Dermatologic Pharmacotherapy
0204-0000-21-785-H01-P

  • Differentiate between type 1 and type 2 diabetes 
  • Identify different classes of medications used to treat diabetes
  • Explain how to reduce and treat hypoglycemia
  • Define diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state
  • Recommend first-line medication treatments for diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state
  • Identify medications used to treat hypertension and dyslipidemia
  • List first-line medications that are used in acute coronary syndromes,cerebrovascular accident, and transient ischemic attack
  • Contrast rate versus rhythm control strategies
  • Differentiate anticoagulants used in venous thromboembolism and atrial fibrillation
  • Summarize appropriate pharmacological treatment of acute/chronic heart failure
  • Describe the pathology of common skin disorders
  • Identify medications for common skin disorders
  • Counsel patients about dermatologic skin products
  • Select appropriate skin care products based on patient symptoms

 

Special Populations and Infectious Diseases
0204-0000-21-786-H01-P

  • Differentiate the pharmacokinetics in geriatric and pediatric populations
  • List medications on the BEERs criteria
  • Recommend appropriate dosing for pediatric patients
  • Identify pregnancy and lactation drug references and resources
  • Describe the role a hospital clinical pharmacist plays in the management of common infectious diseases
  • Recommend antimicrobial medications and protocols
  • Identify elements of a hospital antimicrobial stewardship program

 

Pulmonary Disorders
0204-0000-21-787-H01-P

  • Given a patient case, assess the severity and level of control of their asthma
  • Identify medication safety and tolerability concerns for patients with asthma
  • Recommend appropriate pharmacotherapy for patients with asthma
  • Identify safety and tolerability concerns with medications used for asthma
  • Given a patient case, assess the severity and level of control of their chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Identify medication safety and tolerability concerns for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease
  • Recommend appropriate pharmacotherapy for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

 

Gastrointestinal Disorders and Coping with Chemotherapy
0204-0000-21-788-H01-P

  • Identify medications that can cause constipation, diarrhea, and nausea and vomiting
  • List medications used to treat constipation, diarrhea, and nausea and vomiting
  • Differentiate between pharmacologic classes of medications used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease
  • Summarize medications used in inflammatory bowel disease including potential adverse effects
  • Recommend an appropriate treatment plan for a patient with a
  • gastrointestinal bleed.
  • Assess the risk of chemotherapy induced nausea and vomiting based on emetogenic potential and patient risk factors
  • Apply guideline based recommendations for management of
  • chemotherapy side effects
  • Summarize the rationale for side effect management in clinical cases

 

Neurological Disorders, Pain Management, and Rheumatology
0204-0000-21-789-H01-P

  • Describe management of acute stroke
  • Differentiate the role of a clinical pharmacist in the management of mental health disorders and pain
  • Compare common analgesics used in the treatment of pain
  • Discuss the main causes for gout
  • List the most common treatments for gout
  • Recommend a medication treatment plan for a patient with gout
  • Develop a treatment plan for a patient unable to take oral medications
  • Discuss the main causes for osteoarthritis
  • List the most common treatments for osteoarthritis
  • Recommend a medication treatment plan for a patient with osteoarthritis
  • Discuss the main causes for rheumatoid arthritiis
  • List the most common treatments for rheumatoid arthritiis
  • Recommend a medication treatment plan for a patient with rheumatoid arthritiis

Joshua Bayer, Pharm.D., BCPS, AAHIVP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Department of Veterans Affairs
La Crosse, Wisconsin

Paul M. Boylan, Pharm.D., BCPS
Assistant Professor
The University of Oklahoma College of Pharmacy
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Daniel Brust, Pharm.D.
Patient Aligned Care Team (PACT) Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Wilkes-Barre Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania

Michelle Estevez, Pharm.D., DPLA, BCPS
Emergency Medicine Pharmacist
Lee Health
Fort Myers, Florida

Amanda L. Hedrick, Pharm.D.
Critical Care Pharmacist
University of Virginia Health
Charlottesville, Virginia

J. Nate Hedrick, Pharm.D.
Clinical Pharmacist
Emergency Department
University of Virginia Health
Charlottesville, Virginia

Mary J. Ketchner, Pharm.D.
Clinical Pharmacist
Walter Reed National Military Medical Center
Bethesda, Maryland

Thomas J. Pierson, Pharm.D.
Pharmacy Manager of Specialty Clinic Services
Cleveland Clinic
Cleveland, Ohio

Kate Taucher, Pharm.D., M.H.A., BCOP
Ambulatory Oncology Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
PGY2 Oncology Residency Program Director
UCHealth Memorial Hospital
Medical Key Account Manager
G1 Therapeutics
Colorado Springs, Colorado

Jason T. Wong, Pharm.D., M.B.A., CPPS
Inpatient Operations Manager
PGY1 Pharmacy Residency Program Director
Oregon Health & Science University
Portland, Oregon

In accordance with the ACPE’s and ACCME’s Standards for Commercial Support, everyone in a position to control the content of an educational activity is required to disclose to the accredited provider their relevant financial relationships. An individual has a relevant financial relationship if he or she (or spouse/domestic partner has a financial relationship in any amount occurring in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or services are discussed in the activity content over which the individual has control.

A commercial interest is any entity producing, marketing, re-selling, or distributing healthcare goods or services consumed by, or used on, patients. The Standards for Commercial Support do not consider providers of clinical services directly to patients to be commercial interest.

In this activity, only the individual(s) below have a relevant financial relationship.

Kate Taucher, Pharm.D., MHA, BCOP

  • Employee of GI Therapeutics

All other planners, presenters, reviewers, and staff report no financial relationships relevant to this activity.

This online activity consists of a combined total of 9 learning modules.  Pharmacists are eligible to receive a total of 23.5 hours of continuing education credit by completing all 17 modules within this certificate program.

Participants must participate in the entire activity and complete the evaluation to earn continuing pharmacy education credit.  Follow the prompts online at the ASHP eLearning portal (http://elearning.ashp.org) to claim credit and view statements of credit within 60 days of completing the activity.  Credits will be reported directly to CPE Monitor. To verify that you have completed the required steps and to ensure your credits hours have been reported to CPE Monitor, we encourage you to check your NABP eProfile account to validate your credits were transferred successfully before the ACPE 60-day deadline.  After the 60 day deadline, ASHP will no longer be able to award credit.