Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Specialty Recertification Literature Study: Module 1A-B (Cert # L219153)

ACPE Numbers: Various – see listing below
Pre-Sale Date: 03/17/2021
Content Release Date: 04/14/2021
Expiration Date: 10/19/2021
Activity Type: Application-based
CE Credits: 8 hours (BPS and ACPE)
Activity Fee: $55 (ASHP member); $110 (non-member) 

Accreditation for Pharmacists

 The American Society of Health-System Pharmacists and American College of Clinical Pharmacy are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as providers of continuing pharmacy education.

Target Audience

The Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Specialty Recertification Literature Study is designed to help board-certified pharmacy practitioners who are seeking recertification credit hours to maintain their Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS) Board Certification.

Activity Overview

The Literature Study Module is intended for board certified pharmacists in need of recertification credit and is designed based on the content outline developed by the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS). This module consists of 2 online home study activities (see table below). Each activity is designed to assess the learners’ ability to analyze and apply peer-selected contemporary articles to. 

Module 1A: Treatment of Community-acquired Pneumonia: This module focuses on the guidelines and studies regarding the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia.

Module 1B: Treatment of Bacteremia and Candidemia: This module focuses on the management of infections in hospitalized patients, including Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and Candidemia. 

Learners will be required to review the content and complete the associated online assessments. The learner must be able to correctly answer the questions based upon their interpretation of the content, as well as “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information.” For purposes of this Literature Study, “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information” is defined as product labeling and well-established standards of practice in the specialty practice. 

These activities are part of the ASHP and ACCP professional development program for BCIDP recertification approved by the BPS. 

Recertification Credit*

Board certified pharmacists are eligible to receive up to 8 hours of recertification credit for completing this module. To earn recertification credit, learners must review the activity content and successfully complete the online assessments by the deadline. Only completed assessments will be eligible for credit; no partial or incomplete assessments will be processed. You are allowed only one attempt to successfully complete this assessment.

Learning Activity

ACPE Number

Credit Hours

*Assessment Pass Point

Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Recertification Literature Study Module 1A: Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia

0204-9999-21-975-H01-P

3.00 78%
Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Recertification Literature Study Module 1B: Infectious Diseases Potpourri 0204-9999-21-976-H01-P 5.00 79%

 

Articles and Learning Objectives 

Module 1A: Treatment of Community-Acquired Pneumonia
ACPE Number: 0204-9999-21-975-H01-P
 

This module focuses on the guidelines and studies regarding the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia. 

Metlay et al. Diagnosis and treatment of adults with community-acquired pneumonia. An official clinical practice guideline of the American Thoracic Society and Infectious Diseases Society of America. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2019 Oct 1; 200(7):e45-e67. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the 2019 clinical practice guideline from the American Thoracic Society (ATS) and Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) for the diagnosis and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults.
  • Develop recommendations for the management of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in adults. 

Jones et al. Empirical anti-MRSA vs standard antibiotic therapy and risk of 30-day mortality in patients hospitalized for pneumonia. JAMA Intern Med. 2020;180(4):552-560 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the study of empiric anti-methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and standard antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP).
  • Develop recommendations for empiric antibiotic therapy in patients hospitalized for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP). 

Deshpande A et al. De-escalation of empiric antibiotics following negative cultures in hospitalized patients with pneumonia: rates and outcomes. Clin Infect Dis. 2021, Volume 72, Issue 8, 15 April 2021, Pages 1314–1322, by permission of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the study of the de-escalation of empiric antibiotics following the receipt of negative culture results in hospitalized adults with pneumonia.
  • Develop recommendations for the de-escalation of empiric antibiotics following the receipt of negative culture results in hospitalized adults with pneumonia.

Module 1B: Treatment of Bacteremia and Candidemia
ACPE Number: 0204-9999-21-976-H01-P 

This module focuses on the management of infections in hospitalized patients, including Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia and Candidemia. 

Lodise TP et al.  The emperor's new clothes: prospective observational evaluation of the association between initial vancomycin exposure and failure rates among adult hospitalized patients with MRSA bloodstream infections (PROVIDE). Clin Infect Dis. 2020; 70(8):1536-1545. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Discuss the methods used in the PROVIDE study that evaluated the relationship between vancomycin exposure and treatment failure rates in hospitalized adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections.
  • Apply the efficacy and safety findings from the PROVIDE study to the dosing of vancomycin based on area-under-the-curve (AUC) thresholds in hospitalized adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections.
  • Recommend appropriate vancomycin dosing and pharmacokinetic monitoring for hospitalized adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bloodstream infections. 

Tong et al. Effect of vancomycin or daptomycin with vs without an antistaphylococcal β-lactam on mortality, bacteremia, relapse, or treatment failure in patients with MRSA bacteremia: a randomized clinical trial.  JAMA. 2020; 323(6):527-537. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the methods used in the CAMERA2 study of the addition of an antistaphylococcal ß-lactam antibiotic to standard vancomycin or daptomycin therapy for adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia.
  • Apply the efficacy and safety findings from the study of adding an antistaphylococcal ß-lactam antibiotic to standard vancomycin or daptomycin therapy for adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia.
  • Develop recommendations for the addition of an antistaphylococcal beta-lactam to standard vancomycin or daptomycin therapy for adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia. 

Minejima et al. Defining the breakpoint duration of Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia predictive of poor outcomes. Clin Infect Dis. 2020 Feb 3;70(4):566-573. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the methods used in the study of the association between Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteremia duration and clinical outcomes in hospitalized adults.
  • Recommend appropriate management for patients with prolonged Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) bacteremia. 

Geriak et al. Clinical data on daptomycin plus ceftaroline versus standard of care monotherapy in the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. Antimicrob Agents Chemother. 2019; 63(5):e02483-18.

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the methods used in the study comparing initial daptomycin plus ceftaroline combination therapy with daptomycin or vancomycin monotherapy in adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia.
  • Apply the efficacy and safety findings from the study comparing initial daptomycin plus ceftaroline combination therapy with standard vancomycin or daptomycin monotherapy for adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia.
  • Develop recommendations for antibiotic treatment of adults with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) bacteremia. 

Kullberg et al. Isavuconazole versus caspofungin in the treatment of candidemia and other invasive Candida infections: the ACTIVE trial. Clin Infect Dis. 2019; 68(12):1981-1989. 

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the ACTIVE trial comparing isavuconazole with caspofungin for the treatment of patients with candidemia or other invasive Candida infections
  • Develop recommendations for antifungal treatment of patients with candidemia or other invasive Candida infections. 

Chesdachai et al. The effect of infectious diseases consultation on mortality in hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, Candida, and Pseudomonas Bloodstream Infections. Open Forum Infect Dis. 2020; 7(1):ofaa010.  

Learning Objectives:

  • Describe the study of the effect of infectious diseases (ID) consultation on mortality in hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Candida, or Pseudomonas bloodstream infections.
  • Develop recommendations for the use of infectious diseases (ID) consultation for hospitalized patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Candida, or Pseudomonas bloodstream infection. 

Faculty

Full Faculty Bios

Bhavik Shah, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Jefferson College of Pharmacy
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania                                                                                                                                                             

Gary Fong, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Assistant Professor
Chapman University School of Pharmacy
Irvine, California                                                                    

Trang Trinh, Pharm.D., M.P.H., BCPS, BCIDP
Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy
UCSF School of Pharmacy
San Francisco, California 

Content Matter Experts

Kevin Garey, Pharm.D., M.S., FASHP
Professor and Chair
University of Houston
Houston, Texas 

Jason Schafer,Pharm.D., M.P.H., BCIDP, BCPS-AQ ID, AAHIVP
Professor and Vice Chair, Department of Pharmacy Practice
Jefferson College of Pharmacy, Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Kayla Stover, Pharm.D., BCIDP, BCPS, FCCP, FIDSA
Associate Professor
University of Mississippi School of Pharmacy
Jackson, Mississippi 

Evan Zasowski, Pharm.D., M.P.H., BCIDP, BCPS
Assistant Professor
Touro University California College of Pharmacy
Vallejo, California 

Reviewers

Susan R. Dombrowski, M.S., RPh
Kristi Hofer, Pharm.D. 

Field Testers

Jaime Borkowski, Pharm.D., BCIDP, BCPS
Lauren Bricker, Pharm.D.
Travis Carlson, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Michael Casias, Pharm.D., BCIDP, AAHIVP
Robbie Christian, BCIDP
Yewande Dayo, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Daniel Delaney, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Mei Qin  Dong, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDS
Danielle Dufresne, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Mercedes Fraga, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP, BCCCP
Julie Giddens, Pharm.D., BCPS AQID, BCPID
Tara Harpenau, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Lawahidh Hasham , Pharm.D.
Jeffrey Jansen, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Rebecca Jayakumar, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Matthew Lambie, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Tiffany Lee, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Rosanna Li, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Monica Mahoney, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Evan Mallory, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Kari  McCracken, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Ryan Moenster, Pharm.D., FIDSA, BCIDP
Kiya Mohadjer, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Clara Ni, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Pratish Patel, Pharm.D., BCIDP, AAHIVP
Leonor  Rojas , Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Stephanie Shulder, Pharm.D., BCIDP
Brenda  Simiyu, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Emily Sinclair, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Jessica Smith, Pharm.D., M.B.A., BCIDP
Natalie Tucker, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Mary Ullman, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCIDP
Agnes Vitarini, Pharm.D., BCGP, BCIDP, BCPS
Solomon Alexander Winans, Pharm.D., BCIDP 

Disclosures

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, ASHP and ACCP requires that all individuals involved in the development of activity content disclose their relevant financial relationships. A person has a relevant financial relationship if the individual of his or her spouse/partner has a financial relationship (e.g. employee, consultant, research grant recipient, speakers bureau, or stockholder) in any amount occurring the in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or series may be discussed in the educational activity content over which the individual has control. The existence of these relationships is provided for the information of participants and should not be assumed to have an adverse impact on the content. 

All faculty and planners for ASHP and ACCP education activities are qualified and selected by ASHP and ACCP, are required to disclose any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. ASHP and ACCP identify and resolves conflicts of interest prior to an individual’s participation in development of content for an educational activity. Anyone who refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships must be disqualified from any involvement with a continuing pharmacy education activity. 

All other planners, presenters, and reviewers and others with an opportunity to control content report no financial relationships relevant to this activity.

Methods and CE Requirements

Activities consist of educational materials, assessments, and activity evaluations. In order to receive continuing pharmacy education credit, learners must:

  • Complete the attestation statement
  • Review all content
  • Complete and pass the assessments
  • Complete the evaluations 

Follow the prompts to claim, view, or print the statement of credit within 60 days after completing the activity. 

System Technical Requirements

Courses and learning activities are delivered via your Web browser and Acrobat PDF. For all activities, you should have a basic comfort level using a computer and navigating web sites. 

View the minimum technical and system requirements for learning activities. 

Development

These activities were developed by ASHP and ACCP.