Ambulatory Care Self-Assessment Program (ACSAP) Book 1: Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care (Cert # L219174)

ACPE Numbers: Various – see listing below
Pre-Sale Date: 02/17/2021
Release Date: 03/15/2021
Expiration Dates: 10/01/2021
Activity Type: Application-based
CE Credits: 15.5 hours (BPS and ACPE)
Activity Fee: $75 (ASHP member); $110 (non-member)

Accreditation for Pharmacists

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and American Society of Health-System Pharmacists are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as providers of continuing pharmacy education.

Target Audience

The target audience for ACSAP 2021 Book 1 (Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care) is board-certified and advanced-level ambulatory care pharmacists who manage patients with complex cardiovascular diseases.

Activity Overview

This course is intended for board certified pharmacists in need of recertification credit and is designed based on the content outline developed by the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS). The course consists of 4 learning modules (see table below) and provides up to 15.5 hours of continuing pharmacy education and/or recertification credit.

Learners will be required to review the content and complete the associated online assessments. The learner must be able to correctly answer the questions based upon their interpretation of the content, as well as “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information.” For purposes of this course, “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information” is defined as product labeling and well-established standards of practice in the specialty practice.

These activities are part of the ASHP and ACCP professional development program for BCACP recertification approved by the BPS. 

Recertification Credit*

Board certified pharmacists are eligible to receive up to 15.5hours of recertification credit for completing this course. To earn recertification credit, learners must review the activity content and successfully complete the online assessments by the deadline. Only completed assessments will be eligible for credit; no partial or incomplete assessments will be processed. You are allowed only one attempt to successfully complete this assessment.

Learning Activity

ACPE Number

Credit Hours

*Assessment Pass Point

Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care I

0217-9999-21-006-H01-P

4.5

63%

Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care II

0217-9999-21-007-H01-P

6.5

71%

Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care III

0217-9999-21-008-H01-P

4.5

75%

 

Please note, the Ambulatory Care Pharmacy Preparatory Review and Recertification Courses, as well as the Fundamentals of Biostatistics and Study Design Workshop, may only be completed for recertification credit up to two times, in nonconsecutive years, during the 7-year recertification cycle.

Learning Objectives

Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care I
ACPE Number:  0217-9999-21-006-H01-P

  • Distinguish the cardiovascular (CV) risk-benefit of individual DPP-4 (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) inhibitors.
  • Evaluate the cardiorenal risk-benefit of incretin mimetics and SGLT-2 (sodium-dependent glucose cotransporter-2) inhibitors.
  • Using guidelines and primary literature develop a patient-specific plan on the basis of CV and renal history and risk factors.
  • Evaluate the key diagnostic criteria used to differentiate types of diabetes.
  • Evaluate for patient-specific risk factors, clinical presentation, and treatment of the various forms of diabetes.
  • Design optimal individualized treatment plans for the various forms of diabetes.

Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care II
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-21-007-H01-P

  • Evaluate patients for risk factors associated with hyperuricemia and gout.
  • Distinguish the role of hyperuricemia and gout in the development of other comorbidities.
  • Design patient-centered pharmacotherapy for management of acute gout flare as well as chronic gout.
  • Apply principles of pharmacogenomics and treatment guidelines in the selection of patient-specific therapy for gout.
  • Justify patient-centered nonpharmacologic recommendations for patients with gout.
  • Develop gout care models to address the challenges in gout management.
  • Evaluate risk factors and screening criteria for osteoporosis and determine appropriate prevention strategies.
  • Distinguish differences between treatment approaches, including those for men and women and those discussed in guideline updates.
  • Develop an osteoporosis treatment regimen based on patient-specific factors and adjust when first-line agents fail or are not appropriate.
  • Design a monitoring plan for a patient with osteoporosis, including steps to follow when a suboptimal response to therapy occurs.
  • Apply an understanding of the FDA approval process of biosimilars including naming and labeling requirements.
  • Distinguish between different biologic drugs and their clinical applications according to the national guidelines and evidence from primary literature.
  • Evaluate clinical and safety data on biosimilars and compare with corresponding reference products.
  • Apply evidence-based information on current biosimilar topics including efficacy, immunogenicity, cost, and availability.
  • Justify the role of the clinical pharmacist in caring for patients on biologics and biosimilars with rheumatologic conditions.

Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care III
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-21-008-H01-P

  • Distinguish differences in the rationale for the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies (REMS) and goals of the regulations.
  • Evaluate the components of a medication guide on patient understanding.
  • Develop a patient education and monitoring plan in accordance with REMS regulations.
  • Assess the utility of REMS on patient engagement and quality of care.
  •  Distinguish between different continuous glucose monitoring systems and billing codes for ambulatory care pharmacist services.
  • Evaluate glucometrics from an ambulatory glucose profile report.
  • Distinguish between different sensor-augmented pump therapies and insulin delivery devices.
  • Design a diabetes management regimen that includes diabetes apps.
  • Evaluate new glucagon formulations and devices for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia.
  • Design a regimen to reduce the impact of a patient’s lifestyle habits and concomitant medications that negatively impact weight.
  • Justify clinical goals for individual patients based on guidelines and comorbidities.
  • Evaluate patients as candidates for weight loss pharmacotherapy based on current guidelines.
  • Develop evidence-based pharmacotherapy for initial weight reduction and for patients experiencing a poor response to therapy.
  • Design nutritional supplementation pharmacotherapy for patients who have undergone bariatric surgery for weight reduction.
  • Develop a pharmacotherapy plan to prevent weight regain after bariatric surgery.

Planners, Presenters and Reviewers

Faculy Panel Chair

Jennifer N. Clements, Pharm.D., FCCP, FADCES, BCPS, BCACP, BC-ADM, CDCES
Clinical Pharmacist—Diabetes Transitions
Department of Nursing Administration
Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System
Spartanburg, South Carolina

Series Editors

Dave L. Dixon, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCPS, CDCES, CLS, FNLA, FCCP, FACC
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Sciences
Virginia Commonwealth University
School of Pharmacy
Richmond, Virginia 

Ila M. Harris, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health
University of Minnesota Medical School
Minneapolis, Minnesota

Reviewers

Nicole Paolini Albanese, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES
Clinical  Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University at Buffalo
Buffalo, New York 

Susan P. Bruce, Pharm.D., BCPS
Dean and Professor
School of Pharmacy
Wingate University
Wingate, North Carolina 

Gregory Castelli, Pharm.D., BCPS, BC-ADM
Clinical Pharmacist
Director, PGY1 Pharmacy Residency
Department of Medical Education
UPMC St. Margaret
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 

Jennifer N. Clements, Pharm.D., FCCP, FADCES, BCPS, BCACP, BC-ADM, CDCES
Clinical Pharmacist—Diabetes Transitions
Department of Nursing Administration
Spartanburg Regional Healthcare System
Spartanburg, South Carolina 

Erica F. Crannage, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, BCACP
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Health Sciences & Pharmacy
St. Louis St. Louis, Missouri 

Jessica F. Farrell, Pharm.D.
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice  Clinical Pharmacist
The Center for Rheumatology
Program Coordinator, PGY2 Ambulatory Care Residency
Associate Medical Officer
Steffens Scleroderma Foundation
Albany College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
Albany, New York 

Rachel B. Franks, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapeutics and Clinical Research
University of South Florida
Tampa, Florida 

Brian K. Irons, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCACP
Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center
Jerry H. Hodge School of Pharmacy
Lubbock, Texas 

Karen L. Kier, Ph.D., M.Sc., R.Ph.,FCCP, FASHP, BCPS, BCACP, CTTS
Professor of Pharmacy Practice Director of Assessment
Director of Drug and Health Information Preventive Care Specialist, ONU HealthWise Raabe
College of Pharmacy
Ohio Northern University
Ada, Ohio 

Tegan K. Magsam, Pharm.D., BCACP, CPP
Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner
Raleigh, North Carolina 

Margaret A. Miklich, Pharm.D., BCACP
Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Temple University School of Pharmacy
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 

Jessica Odom, Pharm.D., BCPS, BC-ADM
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist and Diabetes Educator Pharmacy and Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support
Prisma Health–Upstate
Greenville, South Carolina 

Nathan A. Painter, Pharm.D., FADCES, CDCES
Clinical Professor
UC San Diego Skaggs
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
La Jolla, California 

Michelle L. Rager, Pharm.D., BCPS, CDCES, CPP
Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner
Department of Pharmacy
Novant Health New Hanover Regional Medical Center
Wilmington, North Carolina 

Krystal KC Riccio, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
College of Pharmacy
Roseman University of Health Sciences
Henderson, Nevada 

James G. Stevenson, Pharm.D., FASHP, FFIP
Professor
Department of Clinical Pharmacy
University of Michigan College of Pharmacy
Ann Arbor, Michigan 

Jennifer M. Trujillo, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, CDCES, BC-ADM
Professor
Department of Clinical Pharmacy
University of Colorado Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Aurora, Colorado 

Heather P. Whitley, Pharm.D., BCPS, CDCES
Clinical Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy
Auburn, Alabama
Clinical  Pharmacy Specialist
Baptist Family Medicine Baptist Health System
Montgomery, Alabama

Authors

Lanh Dang, Pharm.D., BCACP
Clinical Ambulatory Pharmacist—Multispecialty
Department of Pharmacy
UF Health Jacksonville
Jacksonville, Florida 

Kira Harris, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS, CDCES, CPP
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Family Medicine Residency Program Novant Health
Cornelius, North Carolina 

Rick Hess, Pharm.D., BCACP, CDCES, BC-ADM
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Bill Gatton College of Pharmacy at East Tennessee State University
Johnson City, Tennessee 

Jeannie Hong, Pharm.D., BCPS
Rheumatology Specialty Pharmacist
Department of Internal Medicine
Phoenix Indian Medical Center
Phoenix, Arizona 

Diana Isaacs, Pharm.D., FADCES, FCCP, BCPS, BCACP, BC-ADM, CDCES
Endocrine Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
CGM and Remote Monitoring Program Coordinator Co-Director Center of Excellence for Endocrine Disorders in Pregnancy
Cleveland Clinic Endocrinology & Metabolism Institute
Cleveland, Ohio 

Katharine McCarthy, Pharm.D., BCACP
Clinical Pharmacist
University of Rochester Specialty Pharmacy
Rochester, New York 

Kimberly Lovin Nealy, Pharm.D., BCPS, CDCES, CPP
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
School of Pharmacy Wingate University
Wingate, North Carolina
Clinical Pharmacist Practitioner
Novant Health Senior Care of Matthews Novant Health
Matthews, North Carolina 

Lalita Prasad-Reddy, Pharm.D., MS, BCPS, BCACP, CDCES
Assistant Dean for Student Affairs
Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Chicago State University
College of Pharmacy Clinical Pharmacy
Specialist—Internal Medicine
Rush University Internists
Associate Discipline Director of Pharmacology
Assistant Professor in Internal Medicine
Rush Medical College
Chicago, Illinois

 

Youssef M. Roman, Pharm.D., Ph.D.
Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Science
Virginia Commonwealth
University School of Pharmacy
Richmond, Virginia 

Nehal R. Shah, M.D.
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Department of Internal Medicine
Virginia Commonwealth University
Richmond, Virginia 

Pamela L. Stamm, Pharm.D., FASHP, BCACP, BCPS, CDCES
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
Auburn University Harrison
School of Pharmacy
Auburn, Alabama
Clinical Pharmacist Specialist
Central Alabama
Veterans Health Care System
Fort Benning Community Based Outpatient Clinic
Fort Benning, Georgia
Clinical Pharmacist Specialist
Tuscaloosa Veterans Affairs Medical Center
Tuscaloosa, Alabama 

Veronica Vernon, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCACP, NCMP
Assistant Professor
Department Pharmacy Practice
Butler University
College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences
Indianapolis, Indianapolis

Acknowledgment

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care I chapters:

Dave L. Dixon, Pharm.D., BCACP, BCPS, CDE, CLS, FNLA, FCCP, FACC
Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Outcomes Sciences
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy
Richmond, Virginia 

Anne L. Hume, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor of Pharmacy  Department of Pharmacy Practice University of Rhode Island Kingston, Rhode Island
Adjunct Professor of Family Medicine
Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University
Providence, Rhode Island 

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care II chapters:

Joseph S. Bubalo, Pharm.D., BCPS, BCOP
Oncology Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Assistant Professor of Medicine
Oregon Health and Science University Hospital and Clinics
Portland, Oregon 

Ila M. Harris, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Professor
Department of Family Medicine and Community Health University of Minnesota Medical School
Minneapolis, Minnesota 

Olga Hilas, Pharm.D., MPH, BCPS, BCGP, FASCP
Associate Professor—Clinical Health Professions
SBIRT and OOPP Programs Director  Assistant to the Dean—Academic Advisement College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences
St. John’s University
Queens, New York 

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Endocrinology and Rheumatology Care III chapters: 

Lynn Kassel, Pharm.D., BCPS
Associate Professor of Clinical Sciences
Department of Clinical Sciences
Drake University College of Pharmacy & Health Sciences Des Moines, Iowa
Acute Care Pharmacist
MercyOne West Des Moines Hospital
West Des Moines, Iowa 

Mary Wun-Len Lee, Pharm.D., FCCP, BCPS
Vice President and Special Assistant to the President
Midwestern University Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Chicago College of Pharmacy
Downers Grove, Illinois

Disclosures

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, ASHP and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy require that all individuals involved in the development of activity content disclose their relevant financial relationships. A person has a relevant financial relationship if the individual of his or her spouse/partner has a financial relationship (e.g. employee, consultant, research grant recipient, speakers bureau, or stockholder) in any amount occurring the in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or series may be discussed in the educational activity content over which the individual has control. The existence of these relationships is provided for the information of participants and should not be assumed to have an adverse impact on the content.

All faculty and planners for ASHP education activities are qualified and selected by ASHP and required to disclose any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. ASHP identifies and resolves conflicts of interest prior to an individual’s participation in development of content for an educational activity. Anyone who refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships must be disqualified from any involvement with a continuing pharmacy education activity.

  • Consultancies: Jessica F. Farrell (Gilead Sciences, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc); Rachel Franks (Hillsborough County Diabetes Education Advisory Board, Plant Based Lifestyle Movement Board); Diana Isaacs (Dexcom, Novo); Karen L. Kier (ASHP AJHP); Tegan K. Magsam (Rheumatology Advanced Practice Providers); Krystal KC Riccio (SAMHSA); Youssef M. Roman (Life DNA); Pamela L. Stamm (ACCP, ASHP Foundation); Jennifer Trujillo (BD, Novo Nordisk); Heather P. Whitley (Southeastern Diabetes Education Services)
  • Stock Ownership: James G. Stevenson (Omnicell, Inc.)
  • Royalties: Karen L. Kier (McGraw-Hill Publishing); Pamela L. Stamm (ASHP Foundation)
  • Grants: Jessica F. Farrell (Janssen); Rachel Franks (ACCP); Rick Hess (ASHP Foundation); Jessica Odom (PrismaHealth Health Science Center); Pamela L. Stamm Grants (National Association of Chain Drug Stores Foundation, ASHP Foundation, Auburn University Biggio Center)
  • Honoraria: Jessica F. Farrell (Pfizer Abbvie Cumberland Pharmaceuticals ); Kira B. Harris (Novo Nordisk); Diana Isaacs (Dexcom); Tegan K. Magsam (Amgen); Jessica Odom (American Diabetes Association); Krystal KC Riccio (AbbVie); Veronica Vernon (Johnson & Johnson  [Janssen  Pharmaceuticals]); Heather P. Whitley (Astra Zeneca, Novocure)
  • Other: James G. Stevenson (employed by Omnicell, Inc.)

 

All other planners, presenters, and reviewers of this session report no financial relationships relevant to this activity.

Methods and CE Requirements

Activities consist of educational materials, assessments, and activity evaluations. In order to receive continuing pharmacy education credit, learners must:

  • Complete the attestation statement
  • Review all content
  • Complete and pass the assessments
  • Complete the evaluations

Follow the prompts to claim, view, or print the statement of credit within 60 days after completing the activity. 

System Technical Requirements

Courses and learning activities are delivered via your Web browser and Acrobat PDF. For all activities, you should have a basic comfort level using a computer and navigating web sites. 

View the minimum technical and system requirements for learning activities. 

Development

These activities were developed by ASHP and ACCP.