Infectious Diseases Self-Assessment Program (IDSAP) Book 2: Resistant Gram-Positive Infections (Cert # L209359)

ACPE Numbers: Various – see listing below
Pre-Sale Date: 10/14/2020
Release Date: 11/16/2020
Expiration Dates: 05/17/2021
Activity Type: Application-based
CE Credits: 15.5 hours (BPS and ACPE)
Activity Fee: $75 (ASHP member); $110 (non-member)

Accreditation for Pharmacists

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and American Society of Health‐System Pharmacists are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as providers of continuing pharmacy education

Target Audience

The target audience for IDSAP 2020 Book 2 (Resistant Gram-Positive Infections) is board certified and advanced-level infectious disease pharmacists involved in evidence-based management strategies for the prevention and management of drug-resistant gram-negative infections.

Activity Overview

This course is intended for board certified pharmacists in need of recertification credit and is designed based on the content outline developed by the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS). The course consists of 4 learning modules (see table below) and provides up to 16 hours of continuing pharmacy education and/or recertification credit.

Learners will be required to review the content and complete the associated online assessments. The learner must be able to correctly answer the questions based upon their interpretation of the content, as well as “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information.” For purposes of this course, “baseline specialty specific knowledge and/or easily retrievable information” is defined as product labeling and well-established standards of practice in the specialty practice.

These activities are part of the ACCP and ASHP and professional development program for BCIDP recertification approved by the BPS. 

Recertification Credit*

Board certified pharmacists are eligible to receive up to TBD hours of recertification credit for completing this course. To earn recertification credit, learners must review the activity content and successfully complete the online assessments by the deadline. Only completed assessments will be eligible for credit; no partial or incomplete assessments will be processed. You are allowed only one attempt to successfully complete this assessment.

Learning Activity

ACPE Number

Credit Hours

*Assessment Pass Point

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections I

0217-9999-20-222-H01-P

4.0

80%

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections II

0217-9999-20-223-H01-P

4.0

76%

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections III

0217-9999-20-224-H01-P

4.5

70%

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections IV

0217-9999-20-225-H01-P

3.0

75%

 

Learning Objectives

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections I
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-20-222-H01-P

  • Evaluate patients for signs of epidemiology of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections.
  • Justify the use of diagnostic tests to detect antibiotic resistance in S. aureus.
  • Develop patient-specific diagnostic and antibiotic treatment plans using infection-specific S. aureus epidemiology.
  • Develop antibiotic treatment strategies for MRSA infections using patient- and infection-specific information and available scientific evidence.
  • Evaluate risk factors for mortality in patients with enterococcal infection.
  • Assess for mechanisms of resistance to antibiotics commonly used in the treatment of enterococcal infections.
  • Design antimicrobial treatment regimens (agent, dose, frequency) for the patient with enterococcal infection.
  • Design antimicrobial treatment regimens (agent, dose, frequency) for the treatment of vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bloodstream infection.

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections II
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-20-223-H01-P

  • Evaluate patients with Streptococcus pneumoniae infection, accounting for national and local rates of drug resistance.
  • Apply an understanding of the mechanisms of S. pneumoniae drug resistance in designing pharmacotherapy regimens.
  • Evaluate patient risk factors for drug-resistant S. pneumoniae.
  • Determine antibiotic options for drug-resistant S. pneumoniae, and design optimal antibiotic regimens according to location of infection.
  • Evaluate strategies to prevent drug-resistant S. pneumoniae infections.
  •  Analyze changes in the epidemiology of Clostridioides difficile infection (CDI) for potential causes or associations.
  • Evaluate patient populations for CDI on the basis of associated morbidity and recurrence rates.
  • Design appropriate treatment regimens for CDI in various settings and severities.
  • Evaluate evidence for CDI primary and secondary prevention interventions

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections III
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-20-224-H01-P

  • Evaluate the role of rapid diagnostic testing in achieving antimicrobial stewardship goals.
  • Evaluate available technologies and methods for identifying gram-positive organisms and resistance mechanisms.
  • Justify the use of antimicrobial stewardship teams in optimizing utilization of rapid diagnostic tests.
  • Justify involvement of the antimicrobial stewardship team in management of commonly seen gram-positive infections
  • Assess patients for barriers to implementation of rapid diagnostic testing
  • Develop solutions that overcome barriers to implementation of rapid diagnostic testing
  • Apply the basic principles of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) properties of antibiotics and incorporate them into patient care.
  • Apply PK/PD principles as they pertain to gram-positive antibiotics.
  • Develop therapeutic dosing strategies for gram-positive agents using PK/PD metrics and consideration of patient- and pathogen-specific factors.
  • Justify the use of PK/PD principles of gram-positive agents in antimicrobial stewardship.

Resistant Gram-Positive Infections IV
ACPE Number: 0217-9999-20-225-H01-P

  • Differentiate between the combination options in the use of salvage combination therapy for Staphylococcus aureus infection.
  • Evaluate antibiotic effectiveness in combination therapy for Staphylococcus aureus infection.
  • Assess for limitations of utilizing antibiotic combination for Staphylococcus aureus infection.
  • Assess the application of antibiotic combination for Staphylococcus aureus in certain infections.
  • Design a practice-specific C. difficile diagnostic testing algorithm that minimizes the risk of false-positive and false-negative results.
  • Evaluate the appropriateness of repeat C. difficile testing in patients recently tested or treated for C. difficile-associated diarrhea.
  • Justify withholding diagnostic testing for C. difficile diarrhea in patients not meeting appropriate clinical criteria to test.
  • Develop a strategy to reduce health care facility–onset C. difficile infection rates.

Planners, Presenters, and Reviewers 

Antimicrobial Stewardship Pharmacist
Vanderbilt University Medical Center
Nashville, Tennessee

Associate Professor of Medicine
Division of Infectious Diseases
Duke University School of Medicine Director of Operations
Duke Antimicrobial Stewardship Outreach Network (DASON)
Durham, North Carolina
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy
Infectious Diseases Pharmacist
Hospital Pharmacy Services
University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System Chicago, Illinois

Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Department of Pharmacy
Advocate Aurora Health Advocate Children’s Hospital
Park Ridge, Illinois

Assistant Professor
Departments of Pharmacy Practice and Internal Medicine
University of Kansas
Schools of Pharmacy and Medicine
Kansas City, Kansas

Clinical Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research
University of Florida, College of Pharmacy
Infectious Diseases
Pharmacotherapy Specialist, Department of Pharmacy
University of Florida Health Jacksonville
Jacksonville, Florida

Division Infectious Diseases Pharmacist
Pharmacy Administration
HealthTrust Supply Chain/Capital Division
Richmond, Virginia

Department of Pharmacy Service
Oklahoma City VA Health Care System
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma

Infectious Diseases Team Lead
Co-Lead, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program
Department of Pharmacy
Northwestern Memorial Hospital
Chicago, Illinois

Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy
Infectious Diseases Clinical Pharmacist
University of Illinois Hospital and Health Sciences System
Chicago, Illinois

Coordinator, Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Programs
Department of Pharmacy
Duke University Hospital
Durham, North Carolina

Assistant Professor
Department of Clinical Sciences
Touro University California
College of Pharmacy
Vallejo, California

Department of Pharmacy Practice
Wegmans School of Pharmacy/St. John Fisher College
Rochester, New York
Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship Program
St. Josephs Health
Syracuse, NY

Advanced Clinical Pharmacist – Infectious Diseases
Gulf Coast Regional Medical Center
Panama City, Florida

Infectious Diseases Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Antimicrobial Stewardship
Department of Pharmacy
Blount Memorial Hospital
Maryville, Tennessee

Lead Pharmacist, Infectious Diseases Associate Director, Antimicrobial Stewardship
Director, PGY2 Infectious Diseases Residency Program
Department of Pharmacy Services
University of Virginia Health
Clinical Assistant Professor
Division of Infectious Diseases and International Health
University of Virginia School of Medicine
Charlottesville, VirginiaClinical Associate Professor
Virginia Commonwealth University School of Pharmacy
Richmond, Virginia

Coordinator, Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Programs
Department of Pharmacy
Duke University Hospital
Durham, North Carolina

Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Infectious Diseases
Department of Pharmacy
University of North Carolina Medical Center
Chapel Hill, North Carolina

Pharmacy Clinical Coordinator 
Department of Pharmacy Services 
Chase Brexton Health Care
Baltimore, MD

Assistant Professor
Leslie Dan Faculty of Pharmacy
University of Toronto
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Antimicrobial Management Program
Department of Pharmacy
St. Joseph’s/Candler Health System
Savannah, Georgia

Clinical Pharmacist, Infectious Diseases
Department of Pharmacy
UC Davis Health
Sacramento, California

Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science
University of Maryland School of Pharmacy Associate Professor
Department of Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases
University of Maryland School of Medicine
Baltimore, Maryland

Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Pharmacy Practice
Binghamton University
School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences
Binghamton, New York
Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Medicine
State University of New York Upstate Medical University
Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Infectious Diseases
Department of Pharmacy
State University of New York Upstate University Hospital
Syracuse, New York

Infectious Diseases Pharmacy Specialist Assistant Professor
Department of Pharmacy
University of Texas Southwestern
Dallas, Texas

Department of Pharmacy Practice
Jefferson College of Pharmacy
Thomas Jefferson University
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania

Associate Professor
Department of Pharmacy Practice
University of Mississippi
School of Pharmacy
Jackson, Mississippi

Clinical Pharmacist - Solid Organ Transplant
Department of Pharmacy
Henry Ford Hospital
Detroit, Michigan

Assistant Professor of Clinical Pharmacy
Department of Clinical Pharmacy
University of California, San Francisco School of Pharmacy
San Francisco, California

Specialty Practice Pharmacist, Infectious   Diseases Department of Pharmacy
The Ohio State University
Wexner Medical Center
Columbus, Ohio

The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Resistant Gram-Positive Infections I chapters:

Oncology Clinical Pharmacy Specialist
Assistant Professor of Medicine
Oregon Health and Science University Hospital and Clinics
Portland, Oregon

Professor
Pharmacy Practice
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Little Rock, Arkansas


The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Resistant Gram-Positive Infections II chapters:

Professor, Pharmacy Practice
McWhorter School of Pharmacy
Samford University
Birmingham, Alabama

Professor, Pharmacy Practice
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Little Rock, Arkansas


The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Resistant Gram-Positive Infections III features:

Clinical Pharmacy Specialist, Infectious Diseases/HIV
Antimicrobial Stewardship Program Pharmacy Director
Veterans Affairs Medical Center
West Palm Beach, Florida
Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice
University of Florida College of Pharmacy
Gainesville, Florida

Associate Professor of Pharmacy (retired)
Division of Practice Advancement and Clinical Education
Eshelman School of Pharmacy
The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill, North Carolina


The American College of Clinical Pharmacy and the authors thank the following individuals for their careful review of the Resistant Gram-Positive Infections IV features:

Director of Pharmacy
Shirley Ryan Abilitylab (formerly the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago)
Chicago, Illinois

Professor of Pharmacy Practice
Assistant Dean, Curriculum Development & Interprofessional Education
School of Pharmacy
Duquesne University
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Disclosures

In accordance with the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education’s Standards for Commercial Support and the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education’s Standards for Commercial Support, the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP) and the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) require that all individuals involved in the development of activity content disclose their relevant financial relationships. A person has a relevant financial relationship if the individual of his or her spouse/partner has a financial relationship (e.g. employee, consultant, research grant recipient, speakers bureau, or stockholder) in any amount occurring the in the last 12 months with a commercial interest whose products or series may be discussed in the educational activity content over which the individual has control. The existence of these relationships is provided for the information of participants and should not be assumed to have an adverse impact on the content.

All faculty and planners for ACCP and ASHP education activities are qualified and selected by ACCP and ASHP and required to disclose any relevant financial relationships with commercial interests. ACCP and ASHP identifies and resolves conflicts of interest prior to an individual’s participation in development of content for an educational activity. Anyone who refuses to disclose relevant financial relationships must be disqualified from any involvement with a continuing pharmacy education activity.

  • Consultancies: Daniel S. Baker (Shionogi); Nicholas S. Britt (Gilead Sciences, Inc, Merck and Co.); Anthony M. Casapao (Spero Therapeutics, Tetraphase, Paratek Pharmaceuticals, Florida Department of Health); Emily L. Heil (Wolters Kluwer/Lexi-Comp); Wesley D. Kufel (Theratechnologies, Inc.); Marguerite L. Monogue (Wolters Kluwer); Eric R. Wenzler (Shionogi, Cepheid, GenMark, Merck and Co.)
  • Stock Ownership: Lisa M. Avery (Merck)
  • Grants: Nicholas S. Britt (Gilead Sciences, Inc, Merck and Co.); Wesley D. Kufel (Melinta; Merck); Eric R. Wenzler (Shionogi, Daiichi-Sankyo, Bristol-Myers Squibb, Merck & Co, Inc, Paratek Pharmaceuticals, Cystic Fibrosis Foundation, Astellas, CDC)
  • Honoraria: Nicholas S. Britt (ProCE, Inc.,/Merck); Anthony M. Casapao (Jacksonville University); Brian Hoff (Midwestern Univer- sity College of Pharmacy; American Society of Health-System Pharmacists); Eric R. Wenzler (Melinta, Astellas, Allergan)
  • All other planners, presenters, reviewers, ASHP and ACCP staff and others with an opportunity to control content report no financial relationships relevant to this activity.

Methods and CE Requirements

Activities can be completed in any order. Each activity consists of audio, video, and/or PDFs and evaluations. Learners must review all content and complete the evaluations to receive continuing pharmacy education credit for each activity.

Follow the prompts to claim, view, or print the statement of credit within 60 days after completing the activity.

System Technical Requirements

Learning activities are delivered via your Web browser and Acrobat PDF. For all activities, you should have a basic comfort level using a computer and navigating web sites.

View the minimum technical and system requirements for learning activities.

Development

These activities were developed by ACCP and ASHP.